Birds Aren’t Real

Birds aren’t real, but watching the newly-launched drones sitting on the feeders outside the window waiting for calibration while they munch a few sunflower seeds is entertaining and enlightening. The new drones are scruffy, skittish, and clumsy. Right out of the factory, these remote-controlled feathered forms do not have the correct coloration to perform as effective spies. It takes a few weeks in the sun for them to reach the hues for which they were programmed. It also takes them a bit of time to determine the precise settings for their internal GPS systems. Nothing funnier than a drone that can’t quite land on the branch or feeder it targeted. And finally, the drones have to ascertain the locations of all nearby charging stations. Sometimes, they get sidetracked in doing the latter by bird feeders. Apparently, the need for a power source to communicate their surveillance findings gets tangled in their internal wiring with the need to act like a bird in front of unwitting citizens.

The extermination of all birds and their subsequent replacement with robots started in the 1950’s. (You can read the entire history of the secret government project in the link below). The complexity of such a project exacerbated by the extreme secrecy of it has made slow going for the CIA. However, the modern creation of long-distance, self-flying drones promises great leaps in the project in the near future. So, set up a couple of feeders and keep an eye on drone development right out your window. You know they are watching you and as an adult American citizen, it is your responsibility to be aware of government actions in all respects.

https://birdsarentreal.com/pages/the-history

photo credit: Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2017

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